Miscellaneous

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  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    That part I knew. I thought you might have personally experienced them in your many travels...
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    Well that was strange. The ref raises his right arm to shoulder height and it gets hurt. I will have to be more careful when reaching for the cookies in the cabinet.
  • Member, Beta Tester
    Richard, my buddy at my temp job said he spent a year in Stirling, Scotland and said it was the most beautiful place he had ever seen. Daffodils everywhere!
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    If you were to see a vehicle with the international license HKJ where would you think it was from?
  • Member, Beta Tester
    He said he visited some ruins surrounded by daffodils that were on an island that was accessible only by boat. Do you where he was talking about?
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    Before your head gets too big about the beauty of Scotland, my friend said it was so cloudy and gray in the winter that he got SAD (which we don't have to worry about here in sunny Florida!).
  • Member, Beta Tester
    Now this really IS miscellaneous:

    The names "John Doe" for males and "Jane Doe" or "Jane Roe" for females are used as placeholder names for a party whose true identity is unknown or must be withheld in a legal action, case, or discussion.[1]. The names are also used to refer to a corpse or hospital patient whose identity is unknown. This practice is widely used in the United States and Canada, but is rare in other English-speaking countries including the United Kingdom itself, from where the use of "John Doe" in a legal context originates. The name Joe Bloggs is used in the U.K instead, as well as in Australia and New Zealand.
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    The first recorded use of grey as a color name in the English language was in AD 700.[2] Grey is the British, Canadian, Australian, Irish, New Zealand and South African spelling, although gray remained in common usage in the UK until the second half of the 20th century.[3] Gray is the preferred American spelling, although grey is an accepted variant, incorrect when dealing with business related decisions.[4][5]
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    My mother LOVED your Skin cancer And Dehydration joke! (But she is going to be 80 on May 4th so she just might be addled!)
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    Good job on the HMJ. I had no idea when iot came up on Jeopardy the other night. I knew it was the kingdom of someplace. But could not put two and two together.
    It was Lady Jane Grey right. Perhaps the old timers used Grey for a name and gray for the color. Hence the Picture of Dorian Gray might have a double meaning.
    I am off for another visit with my old school chums. 1st through 8th grade. There will be a few more this time. I really was just curious about what might have happened to them. I didn't really want to meet up and have to be nice for 2hrs. Anyway. Off I go.
    You guys can continue youre discussion about spelling. Perhaps a battle about suppose and supposed will keep you going.
  • Member, Beta Tester
    How about "could care less" vs "couldn't care less"?
  • Member, Beta Tester
    what about colour and color?
    slightly off topic but I much prefer 'Autumn' as used in the Uk to Fall as used in the USA
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    We use Autumn often. Autumn colour in many parts of this country and Canada are really spectacular.
    I could care less how we spell grey/gray. And I couldn't care less about lots of things.
    Fighting for proper use of the English language is a lost cause. Yes I said it.
  • Member, Beta Tester
    How would we remember Daylight Savings Time though?
    Spring Forward, Autumn Back doesn't have the same ring to it!
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    I have no idea when the date difference started. But we wanted to shed many things that reminded us of England. But we still kept the language. Also. I don't know how long the term soccer has been around. American football came into being in the late 1800's.
    I was going to go into a tirade about the words that become common usage in the language. But there are to many. To many people want to be hip and use street jargon. But I figure I am just old.
  • edited December 2014 Member, Beta Tester
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  • Member, Beta Tester
    I agree about football/soccer. The international ruling body is FIFA. Am I correct. After all. What do I know about it. And here in the US we have for kids the AYSO and soccer is the title of the high school and college teams. I don't know for sure what it is called to the north and south of us.
    On another note. Is there a name for this kind of typing error. Fro/for. Paly/play and so on. Interested minds want to know.
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